Make a Knife at a Japanese Blacksmith

Suwa Area Chino CIty

Learn from hundreds of years of smithing tradition and forge your very own Japanese knife.

Samurai’s katana with their lethal beauty have fascinated generations of foreigners. In the collective imagination a Japanese sword is synonym of sharpness and the smiths who forge those blades are shrouded in mysticism and legends.

With the end of the samurai era, swords stopped being a part of Japanese life. However, the unsurpassed techniques with which their blades were forged keep living in modern blades such as kitchen knives and saws. As a matter of fact, Japanese knives are praised by top-level chefs all over the world for their performance.

A Near Lost Art Continues in the Mountains of Nagano

Hammering the metal

Mass production may have almost taken over the world of blades, yet some stubborn blacksmiths who keep making their knives the old way still stand. In Chino, at the base of the Northern Yatsugatake mountains, you can meet one of them.
Sadamasa, a local smith specializing in blades used in farming and everyday life, has been in business for about 100 years. In the past as many as ten artisans used to work here, providing the locals with all the blades they needed from sickles to kitchen knives. Nowadays Yusuke, the owner’s son, is the only one left.

The first time I stepped into his shop, I felt like I trespassed into another world. It looked stilled in time, as if it had not changed one bit since the early Showa era. The walls and tools blackened by years of forging, the smell of steel and iron, the dim light seeping through the windows to illuminate the work space, everything told the story of years of blade-making.

Learn Knife-making from a Japanese Craftsman

What if I told you that you too can visit this unique world? Or even better, you can witness the smith at work and under his guide forge your own Japanese knife?

Here in Chino, you can join a workshop to learn about Japanese knife-making, and bring back home a knife made with your own hands. In just six hours (over the course of two days), the secret techniques of Japanese blacksmiths can be yours.

Visit Sadamasa in Chino City

From Chino station we walk for about 10 minutes until we reach an old shop with a sign saying “Sadamasa”. To welcome us are Yusuke, the smith, and his father, the owner of the shop. We sit at a table on the back of the shop and Yusuke’s father starts telling us about the history of Sadamasa and how his ancestors opened it many years before. After that, Yusuke takes over and introduces us to that day and the following day’s task. He also explains the features of Japanese knives and what makes them so special.

Once we have acquired more knowledge on the acclaimed blades, we prepare for the tasks at hand and cross the yard at the back of the shop that leads to the workshop. When we open the door, we are catapulted in the world of blade-making. I am stricken by the metallic smell, the blackened walls and the silence, full of promises, while I wait in trepidation.

1. Forging the Blade

We pass through the old machineries to reach Yusuke’s favorite work position. There he lights the fire of the forge and while we wait for it to burn stronger, he shows us the metal bars we are going to use, iron with a heart of steel. He then puts the hammer into motion, the old-fashioned pistons breaking the silence, and expertly moves the impossibly-red incandescent metal under its weight forth and back, right and left, over and over again, until the bar has taken the semblance of a blade.

Hammering by hand

The blade, cooled in cold water, is passed to us. We are to complete the forging by hand. We plunge the blade in the burning forge, lay it on the anvil and hit it rhythmically with the hammer to achieve a smooth surface. Unexpectedly, brute force doesn’t help you in this process as iron is extremely sensitive and too much force causes small bumps to form on the surface. Luckily, Yusuke corrects our mistakes and the end result is amazing.

2. Cutting and Tempering the Blade

Drawing the edges

The next step is to get rid of the oxide film which has formed on the blade by passing it under a shower of sand dust. When that is done, Yusuke takes the blade once more for the normalization process, which requires the skillful hands of the smith. We then cut the excess metal and model the knife final shape.

Finally, we proceed to the last step of the day, tempering!

First, the blade is polished so that during the tempering the heat can propagate all the way to the core. Second, we coat the blade with a thick layer of mud and pass it above the fire to let it dry (this is done to protect the blade). At last, we immerge it inside a hot bubbling substance that looks like magma and conclude by letting it sink into a barrel of oil to rest for several hours.

The job for that day done, we leave (but can’t wait to continue on the following day).

3. Polishing and Sharpening

After polishing

The next day finally comes and we enter the workshop one last time. The tempered blade is there waiting for us.

During the tempering the steel shrinks, so we start by adjusting the warps with a small hammer; except the warps are really difficult to spot. The same blade which seems perfect when I look at it is found in need of many corrections when Yusuke’s trained eyes inspects it. (Craftsmen have such great abilities!)

Putting an edge

What comes after is probably the most important process of all: putting an edge to the blade! To avoid overheating the metal, cold water is constantly poured on it during the whole process. There is so much beauty in seeing the steel appear from under the iron, the shinogi (ridge) slowly forming.

Sharpening the blade

At last, we sharpen the edge by grinding it against a wet natural stone. (This too is very delicate work). The steam rising from the hot blade when it meets the cold wet stone is mesmerizing.

4. Finishing Touchs

Putting on the handle

And… it’s done! We have really made a knife with our own hands and it’s glorious. To check the sharpness, we hold a leaf in midair between our fingers and pass the knife through it from above: there is no resistance, as if we’re cutting through air!

The final result

The handle applied, we put the knife in a box, say farewell to Yusuke and get ready to leave.

Every time I cook with this knife, I’ll remember this experience.

Update:2019/12/27

Make a Knife at a Japanese Blacksmith

Operating Period April to November
Time 3 hours per day over two days
Reservations Necessary (via Chino Tabi Website)
Price 28,000 yen (excluding tax)

 

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